PCIe 6.0 Specification finalized in 2021 and 4 times faster than PCIe 4.0

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So Pci 4.0 is just a phase / gimmick
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PCIe 3.0 stuck around for a long time, I wonder where the next sticking point will be. On the regular consumer side, we aren't even making much use of PCIe 4.0's bandwidth, much less what 5 and 6 offer. I don't know a ton about what the PCIe lanes actually do so I'm curious to see how this shakes out. It reminds me a bit of USB, where 2.0 was around forever and then we got too many versions to keep up with.
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IchimA:

So Pci 4.0 is just a phase / gimmick
How ? Just because faster PCI-E arriving in the future ?
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Considering all the technologies being mentioned are backwards compatible, I'm not seeing the pressing issue with advancing too fast. Hard drive tech is advancing fast too. A few extra variations of spec is all.
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IchimA:

So Pci 4.0 is just a phase / gimmick
We know that before AMD put it on his product... On the diagram from this period it was shown as a short living standard... now it's confirmed 🙂 But even if you have PCIe 3.0 or even 2.* you can still use it, and so the 4.0
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Specs finalize, production and then from server to regular desktop and average consumer so I would expect 4.0 and 5.0 to both get a bit of time before 6.0 is common and then pricing and availability plus CPU and motherboard implementation and how these traces and lanes will be set up and utilized. Will be interesting to see if the newer chipsets and motherboards plus upcoming processors tweak the current 4.0 support and then how Intel and AMD utilizes this. Probably seeing 5.0 first though I have no idea if that's late 2021 or even 2022 for desktop hardware let alone 6.0 here. Assuming it's still up and down compatible with earlier and current standards and hardware anyway so not really too critical and far as desktop / consumer hardware goes I don't see it being too critical although higher-end M.2 / NVME implementations might see some fun stuff depending on what happens here and on the OS in terms of actually utilizing this fully. 🙂 GPU's well that's where that backwards compatibility might be a bit problematic as it would be 3.0 or 4.0 based something like that but aside from AMD's 5500 I think it was (x8 based.) it shouldn't be too critical? EDIT: Eh too early to say I suppose but I don't think 3.0 x16 is struggling that much with current graphics cards still so probably a lesser issue. (Probably other possible uses as speeds improve and maybe other benefits.) EDIT: Need to read up on this compatibility too, guessing sending more power through it and having GPU's fed above the current 75w something could be difficult but it'd be neat with lower-end cable-less as a possibility or less 8x-pin tripple connectors at least. 😛 Eh as if, assuming the card can take it someones going to go it for ha ha. (Well less extreme editions could still see some possible use of it too of course.) EDIT: Nope PAM sounds more like sending more data nothing on voltage or wattage. (Still nifty though along with some of these other features.)
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Don't get too excited. It has historically taken about 2 years for any major new tech standard to begin reaching consumers, so that 2021 date is actually 2023 at the earliest. We haven't even seen any solid indication that PCIe 5.x that was cleared early last year is coming, and the snail's pace that Intel pushes new tech out at means we will probably not see it until 2022.
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All I hope to see from PCIe 6.0 is to drop x16 slots. We still don't have anything that saturates 3.0 @ 16. What we need is more bandwidth for smaller slots. Motherboards can be made simpler and cheaper if we just drop x16.
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schmidtbag:

All I hope to see from PCIe 6.0 is to drop x16 slots. We still don't have anything that saturates 3.0 @ 16. What we need is more bandwidth for smaller slots. Motherboards can be made simpler and cheaper if we just drop x16.
So, where would you to put a 1.5-2Kg GPU? In the air with the power of magic? PCI-e 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 are already a big deal for smaller slots.
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Alessio1989:

So, where would you to put a 1.5-2Kg GPU? In the air with the power of magic? PCI-e 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 are already a big deal for smaller slots.
Have you tried to break off a PCIe slot? Even the non-reinforced ones are on there pretty good. EDIT: Also, there could still be physical x16 slots but they're all electrically x8.
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The epic sag is hard to avoid without a GPU bracket these days. I succumbed last year, and bought a bracket. Recent GPUs are the size and weight of a small Buick.
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Lol...at the end of the day..... All these version 4..5...6.. .....meant for what objective(s)? IMO, only marketing strategies.....for *@#$#@:) ----------------- Made me remember of USB gen x...y..zzzzz;)
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0blivious:

The epic sag is hard to avoid without a GPU bracket these days. I succumbed last year, and bought a bracket. Recent GPUs are the size and weight of a small Buick.
True. I think the impetus is going fall to case manufacturers to support the GPU weight more than the mobo slot. I'd love to see the format shift (though I don't know exactly how) to better support a beefy, cpu-like cooler on the GPU. Maybe liquid coolers shifting the cooler weight from the pcb to a radiator is ultimately the easiest (if more costly) solution.
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For me the future is here. Yesterday just bought 2 M.2 EVO Plus. +3 860 I've had and I'm more than fine.
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considering all pcie 4.0 motherboards are more expensive and require better quality to handle 4.0 i expect to see non watercooled 1300$ motherboards "2080ti style" also pcie 4.0 this far for me has been a gimmick I get the same speeds in real use with 4.0 drives or 3.0, file copy is around 2.1Gb/s on both, don't bother with it
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schmidtbag:

Have you tried to break off a PCIe slot? Even the non-reinforced ones are on there pretty good. EDIT: Also, there could still be physical x16 slots but they're all electrically x8.
So what are you asking? Most of the current motherboards of the market only have 16 lines on one slot.
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I'm excited from a Server point of view, I'm already running dual port 100gb Mellanox cards and raid cards (MegaRAID 9560-16i) that are PCIE 4.0 attached to NVMEs that saturate the PCIE 4.0 quite abit, extra headroom is always great and much needed in the Server space.
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Given the current pricing for gen 4 drives how much more are gen 6 drives going to cost if they can supposedly run 4x faster, im currently running a Corsair mp600 2tb and mp600 1tb on my Asus prime x570pro and Ryzen 7 3800x with 32 gig of ddr4 3600, i moved an 8.5 gig mkv file from my boot drive(mp600 2tb) to my main game drive(mp600 1tb) and the transfer topped out at 1.8gbs for a second then dropped to around 600 mb/s, its good that the tech is advancing but cpu`s and motherboards in general need to improve a lot more to make use of gen 6 let alone gen 4.0
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Alessio1989:

So what are you asking? Most of the current motherboards of the market only have 16 lines on one slot.
I'm saying we don't need electrical x16 slots anymore. Unless there is some unprecedented breakthrough in GPU technology, PCIe 5.0 @ x8 will offer us all the bandwidth we'll ever need for a very long time. As stated before, not even 3.0 @ x16 is fully saturated. If we drop down to x8 lanes, we're still getting more than enough performance but motherboards will be electrically much simpler. Simplicity is good. Not only does the simplicity in and of itself make the boards cheaper (because there are fewer traces to deal with), but the reduced EMI means motherboard tolerances don't have to be so strict, which in turn means you can get by with cheaper components without sacrificing performance. Freeing up those extra 8 lanes can save a lot of space on a motherboard too, which is great for ITX builds. Meanwhile, by dropping x16 slots, motherboard chipsets could still offer the same amount of lanes as they always have but now you could have more M.2 slots or swap out some x1 slots for something better.
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PCIe slots come in different physical configurations: x1, x4, x8, x16, x32. The number after the x tells you how many lanes (how data travels to and from the PCIe card) that PCIe slot has. A PCIe x1 slot has one lane and can move data at one bit per cycle. A PCIe x2 slot has two lanes and can move data at two bits per cycle (and so on). You can insert a PCIe x1 card into a PCIe x16 slot, but that card will receive less bandwidth. Similarly, you can insert a PCIe x8 card into a PCIe x4 slot, but it’ll only work with half the bandwidth compared to if it was in a PCIe x8 slot. Most GPUs require a PCIe x16 slot to operate at their full potential. PCIe standards currently come in three different generations: PCIe 1.0, PCIe 2.0, PCIe 3.0 and PCIe 4.0. Bandwidth doubles with each generation. How do you know what performance you’ll get with a PCIe expansion card? Your PCIe card will run at the lowest generation present. So if you put a PCIe 2.0 card in a PCIe 3.0 slot, you’ll get PCIe 2.0 performance. The PCIe 4.0 standard debuted in 2017 and offers 64 GBps of throughput. It’s available for enterprise-grade servers, but only became usable with SSDs in 2019. The AMD Ryzen 3000-series CPUs that debuted in July 2019 were the first desktop CPUs to support PCIe 4.0 x16 out of the box. For full support, users will need new motherboards running the X570 chipset. Source: Scharon Harding