Intel Chips Banned in Germany Following Patent Dispute: Alder Lake, Ice Lake, and Tiger Lake

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Seems like a case of patent trolling.
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How does one go about proving this patent was infringed upon?
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German bureaucracy is kind of slow and old-fashioned. Do the German judges and officials even know what a patent troll is?
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schmidtbag:

How does one go about proving this patent was infringed upon?
That's a really good question. For an issue like this, they usually have to rely on statements made by Intel in press releases and technical articles or statements from former employees. It is virtually impossible to detect much of anything like this by a physical inspection of the chip itself, even with an electron microscope. With billions of devices, how is one to know exactly what is going on? That would be like looking for a specific backyard in a satellite photo of New York City.
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Gomez Addams:

That's a really good question. For an issue like this, they usually have to rely on statements made by Intel in press releases and technical articles or statements from former employees. It is virtually impossible to detect much of anything like this by a physical inspection of the chip itself, even with an electron microscope. With billions of devices, how is one to know exactly what is going on? That would be like looking for a specific backyard in a satellite photo of New York City.
More like the dog house in the backyard really or the dog food bowl ...or it is somewhere in between those 2 sizes :P
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Gomez Addams:

That would be like looking for a specific backyard in a satellite photo of New York City.
I completely agree with everything you said, but if I may be pedantic for a moment (not to detract from your point but just for geography fun): I think a better example would be Jacksonville, Florida - it's the largest city by area in the lower 48 states, but it has a relatively low population (for its size) of under 1 million. NYC is so dense and tall that there just simply aren't a lot of backyards at all, making it actually relatively easy to find one. In a city like Jacksonville, not only is the area huge but it's mostly suburban housing; very few residential towers, relatively speaking. Perhaps an even better example is perhaps Gilbert, Arizona (and the surrounding area). Pretty easy to get lost in the map there - so repetitive, and huge. I'm sure many Europeans here would find such a city fascinating, not necessarily in a good way.